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The Nursing Shortage & How Baby Boomers Have an Impact

Sep 27, 2016

By now, most in the healthcare industry are aware that the U.S. is currently experiencing a nursing shortage due to explosive demand in the field, but what does that mean?

Medical School Interview Questions: An Overview

Sep 23, 2016

Medical school interview questions can be difficult to decipher if you go into the process blind. Make sure you prepare adequately for your upcoming interview by reviewing the potential questions that'll be asked of you.

Top 10 Most Affordable Medical Schools

Sep 21, 2016

U.S. News and World Report releases its yearly rankings of the best colleges and universities, including medical schools, in the country every year since 1983. Over the decades, the rankings become more comprehensive and diverse.

The 8 Best Gifts for Doctors You'll Ever Find

Sep 16, 2016

Finding the best gifts for doctors in your life can be a real challenge, especially when it seems like they already have everything. Luckily there's a lot out there that they just don't have the time to buy for themselves and that's where we come in. We've curated a list of the best gifts you can buy the busy physician in your life that they'll definitely appreciate.

Free Nursing CEUs & Where to Find Them

Sep 14, 2016

You can find free nursing CEUs fairly easily if you know where to look on the web. Depending on the state in which you work, you may be required to complete up to 30 contact hours every 2 years in order to maintain your license or none may be required at all.

10 Good Reasons for Leaving a Job

Sep 6, 2016

There are many, many good reasons for leaving a job and an even greater number of bad ones. If you're on the market for a new position, its highly likely that you're going to be asked why you left your last job during the interviewing process. There are a multitude of reasons in which someone may look for a new start somewhere else that are perfectly valid, like the company values did not align well with your own, the prospects of future growth opportunities have diminished and there's no real upward mobility, or your current position just isn't very fulfilling.

10 Good Reasons for Leaving a Job:

1. You Were Offered a Better Deal Elsewhere

The labor market is competitive not only for job seekers but also for employers searching for the best talent to fill their positions so they can ultimately grow as an organization. Not only that, but why does anyone go to work, really? Its to make the money necessary to provide security for themselves and others involved in their life. Employers know this, so beating around the bush about it isn't really necessary. In fact, if you, for some reason, don't think its appropriate to bring the subject up and resort to some other, dishonest reason, its likely that the interviewer will pick up on it and it may hurt your chances of being hired.

2. Your Position Wasn't Fulfilling Enough

Another great reason to leave your current position is that you are just patently unsatisfied with what you're dealing with. The position may be mundane or it may not align well with where you see yourself in the future. This is a good reason to leave a job because, no matter how hard you try and tell yourself that you're just overreacting, you'll be left with this feeling that you ought to be doing more. However, before making a break from a current employer for this reason, be sure that the position you'd be taking next would actually be an upgrade in the satisfaction department. The last thing you want to do is make a lateral move to end up in the same position you've just left.

3. Your Previous Employer's Values Did Not Align Well With Your Own

These days every company seems to have their own culture that they try to do business by, and most of us have been through training seminars where they feed them to you hand-over-fist. Some just do it to say that they have a corporate culture, and others take it very seriously. If you've found yourself at one of the latter companies and their code of ethics, or corporate culture, doesn't fit well with what you believe internally, its a good enough reason to search for something new. You'll find that, over time, if you're pressured to conform to the values of a company and they dramatically contradict those of your own, you will end up resenting your employer and things will go downhill from there.

4. Upward Mobility Has All But Diminished

When you started your current position, did the hiring manager boast about all of the upward mobility and constant promotions being handed out to current employees? If so, how true has that been since you stepped foot in the door? Have you yourself been promoted? Do you see people being moved up the chain relatively quickly and being recognized for their exemplary performance? If it seems like your stagnating after a good period of time having worked there, then you probably are. Employers sometimes mention how successful they're doing and how much they value the individuals they currently have on their payroll to new hires in order to build an image and get you excited to be coming on. This images doesn't always hold true though. If you aren't getting recognized how you feel you ought to be, its a good reason for leaving the job.

5. You Feel Overqualified for Your Current Position

This goes hand-in-hand with being unsatisfied with, or feeling unfulfilled by, your current position. There are a few ways you could end up in this situation though. Either you took a job that you knew you were overqualified for, meaning it wasn't going to be a challenge in the least, or you've been in a position long enough to have learned everything it has to offer you in terms of new skills. Either way, its a major problem when your apathy sets in and you are just going through the motions. If you've found yourself not really caring anymore about how well you do the job, its a reason good enough to leave for something more challenging.

6. You Had Personal Issues That Needed Managing

Did something major happen recently that caused you to leave your position? This could be any number of different personal things, such as a death in the family, a newborn child, or moving far from where you were are all good reasons to leave a job, if that is what you need to do. Other reasons could be things such as a major health issue that cannot wait or the need to take care of family in a time of crisis. There may be circumstances where your employer will work with you though, such as transferring you to another branch in the event of a move or cutting your hours to accommodate for other responsibilities in your life.

7. Downsizing; You Were Laid Off

Did your previous employer downsize and decide that your job wasn't making the cut? It can happen to the best of us and is a completely understandable reason for leaving a job. When the question comes up in a future interview, and it will, let them know the circumstances around which the company downsized and why your job was cut, if you know.

8. Extreme Stress or Health Issues

Some jobs can drive you crazy with stress and can cause a litany of health issues. Stress can "directly increase heart rate and blood flow, and causes the release of cholesterol and triglycerides into the blood stream," which can ultimately lead to heart disease. Other illnesses that stress can be a contributor to include asthma, obesity, diabetes, headaches, depression, anxiety, gastrointestinal problems, Alzheimer's disease, accelerated aging, and premature death.

9. You Want to Explore a New Career Path

This reason will resonate to many who have grown tired of what they're currently doing and want to explore new options. Maybe you've gained as much as you can from the job you took a few years ago and you feel stuck in a position with no mobility, and its becoming a boring daily grind. Before you get to the point where you simply don't care for what you're doing at all, and it affects your performance, decide what you'd like to do next. Whether you're just searching for a new employer in the same field or a brand new occupation altogether, its important to plan ahead and get ready for the transition. Once you've decided on what you want you can begin your job search and line up a more challenging, fulfilling position.

10. Your Job Security is Constantly Uncertain

If your current position is in an industry that is continually shrinking or with a company that has not been doing very well recently and keeps cutting jobs to remain financial solvent, its a good reason to leave and find something new. Living under the weight of this kind of uncertainty can stress out the most stalwart among us and lead to the health issues mentioned above, not to mention the effect it will have on your private life. If this sounds familiar then you ought to start your search for something new soon! Companies generally want a 2-week notice when you quit, but many will lay off employees by complete surprise. Don't be one of the ones that's in shock the day it happens by getting out before that day ever comes!

Summary

If you've found your way to this article, then you're probably searching for valid reason to leave your current position as it is. If this is you, then take a little time to analyze the aspects of your position that aren't fulfilling, that you don't particularly enjoy, or that are simply unchallenging before deciding how you'd like to move forward. Be sure that the next job you take doesn't share the qualities that made you unhappy and be picky about the offer you accept in the end. Using any of these above reasons, or a combination, will be understandable to the hiring manager interviewing you. In all likelihood, they've been in the same or a similar position themselves in the past and can probably relate to your situation. As long as your leaving the position wasn't due to performance or any other serious issue with your employment, they will quickly move on to the next question.

Top 10 Online Nurse Practitioner Programs

Aug 30, 2016

If you're considering online nurse practitioner programs to advance your career, we've compiled a list of the best of the best available! These rankings are purely based on the overall quality of education and does not take other important factors into account, such as tuition rates.

The 10 Best Cities for Starting A Nutritionist Practice

Aug 25, 2016

This article originally appeared on SpareFoot.com Healthy eating is an elusive goal for many—but nutritionists are here to help. Nutritionists help clients lead healthy lifestyles by eating the right foods. They also specialize in helping clients manage diseases though diet. As of 2014 there were about 66,700 nutritionists in the U.S., according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. That is expected to grow 16 percent by 2024, much faster than the average for other professions. That got us at SpareFoot wondering: Where are the best places for nutritionists to start a business? To answer this, we teamed up with Thumbtack.com, an online service that connects consumers with skilled professionals to get things done—including finding a nutritionist.

The Top 10

Based on their marketplace data, Thumbtack recently found the top 10 markets with the highest demand for nutritionists, controlling for supply. Cities with the most demand relative to supply scored highest on the Thumbtack Opportunity Index. Thumbtack also provided the average price per session (per customer) for nutritionists in each of those cities. To come up with our list of best cities to start a nutrition counseling business, we also wanted to consider the cost of living and the cost of real estate for your business. To rank the top ten, we scored each city on the following metrics:
  • Price per session (Thumbtack.com)
  • Number of sessions required to pay a median month’s rent
  • Number of sessions required to equal the median home price
  • Number of sessions required to equal asking price per square foot of office space.
Residential real estate data was obtained from Zillow.com and commercial data was obtained from Loopnet.com. Here are the top ten best places for starting a nutritionist business ranked:

10. Baton Rouge, LA

https://twitter.com/LSUCollegeofAg/status/621410420478332929?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw The Louisiana capital might have the lowest going rate for nutritionists at an average of just under $56 per session, but there is no denying that their quite a bit of demand—the city had a market opportunity index of 100, the highest score possible.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 100
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $55.63
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): $104.7
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 1.88
      • Median monthly rent: $1,351
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 24.29
      • Median home price: $189,000
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 3,397

9. Columbus, OH

https://twitter.com/CbusNutritionCo/status/616584978894323712 Meanwhile the capital of Ohio, manages to edge out Baton Rouge when it comes to affordability for nutritionists, thanks to a $75 dollar average cost per session.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 52.17
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $75.02
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): $98.99
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 1.32
      • Median monthly rent: $1,351
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 17.48
      • Median home price: $139,940
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 1,865

8. New Orleans, LA

https://twitter.com/StateIVLP/status/712745934644494337 Back to Louisiana, the state’s largest city had a high opportunity score of 69.81, and offers nutritionists more affordable rent than the previous two locations.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 69.81
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $86.71
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 126.21
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 1.46
      • Median monthly rent: $1,1417
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 16.34
      • Median home price: $238,250
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 2,748

7. Dallas, TX

  https://twitter.com/FoodBankofCC/status/725747251054669824 Dallas has the fourth largest price per session on our list, which is good news for nutritionists. Despite higher asking prices, residential rent is more affordable than the proceeding three cities, and so is office space.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 52.5
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $133.19
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 145.12
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 1.09
      • Median monthly rent: $1,543
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 11.58
      • Median home price: $282,061
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 2,116

6. Louisville, KY

https://twitter.com/voamid/status/659049931655655426 Louisville has the lowest median rent on the list, but is only sixth most affordable rental market due to a lower price per job of $83.83.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 60.14
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $83.83
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 85.61
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 1.02
      • Median monthly rent: $1,133
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 13.52
      • Median home price: $130,250
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 1,554

5. Houston, TX

https://twitter.com/SBCHChealth/status/747812340599394304 Houston had the lowest opportunity index on the list, but that doesn’t mean its not a great choice for nutritionists. The city commands the second highest price per session at $165.52 which makes office space and apartment rent the most affordable on our list so far. However, the city’s sky-high housing prices are a bit less affordable for nutritionists than in most of the other cities on our list.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 51.85
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $165.52
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 142.54
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 0.86
      • Median monthly rent: $1,576
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 9.52
      • Median home price: $324,000
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 1,957

4. Pittsburgh, PA

https://twitter.com/NutritionCheck/status/136128287104704512 Pittsburgh lands within the top five for all of our criteria. Nutritionists should be quite comfortable here whether they choose to rent or buy with an average cost per session of $103.76.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 62.24
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $103.76
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 73.68
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 0.71
      • Median monthly rent: $1,142
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 11.01
      • Median home price: $156,485
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 1,508

3. Rochester, NY

  https://twitter.com/EmKyleNutrition/status/760099523091980289 For a small city, Rochester packs a big punch when it comes to a cost per session of $101.47. The city has the lowest home prices on our list, making it one of the most affordable for nutritionists to purchase a home—only 837 average sessions are required to equal the cost of the median home price.
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 71.82
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $101.47
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 70.26
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 0.69
      • Median monthly rent: $1,395
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 13.75
      • Median home price: $84,900
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 837

2. Las Vegas

https://twitter.com/sincitynutri/status/720416425282781184 Nutritionists in Las Vegas earn quite the premium, earning the highest price per session on our list at $255.51 on average. That also helps make Sin City the most affordable in terms of apartment rents and home prices. Good luck getting clients to steer clear of all-you-can eat buffets though.
        • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 53.95
        • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $255.51
        • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 167.06
        • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 0.65
        • Median monthly rent: $1,242
        • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 4.86
        • Median home price: $199,575
        • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 781

1. Cincinnati, OH

  https://twitter.com/UCAlliedHealth/status/752986344410980352 Cincinnati lands within the top three for all of our criteria, making it our top city overall. It has the most affordable office space compared to the rest of the list—one session generating enough revenue to cover two square foot of office space. The average price per job of $155.83 is nothing to scoff at either
      • Thumbtack Opportunity Index: 72.46
      • Thumbtack Average Price Per Session: $155.83
      • Median asking price for office space (per sq. ft. ): 80.99
      • Number of sessions needed to pay for a square foot of office space: 0.52
      • Median monthly rent: $1,258
      • Sessions required to pay a month’s rent: 8.07
      • Median home price: $156,175
      • Number of sessions needed to equal home price: 1,002

Top 10 Best Hospitals in the U.S.

Aug 23, 2016

On August 2, 2016, U.S. News & World Report released its 27th annual Best Hospitals  in the U.S. to help both patients and healthcare professionals to make better decisions about their futures.

Top 10 Best Compression Stockings for Nurses

Aug 16, 2016

Compression stockings for nurses are becoming more and more popular as the demand for more healthcare employees has risen. Nurses can be expected to work many extra hours during times when the hospital is particularly busy, so be sure you're well-prepared for the physical demands.